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Posted on Sep 5, 2014 in 2 year Australian Working Holiday visa, Australia, Backpacking |

How to Get a Second Working Holiday Visa for Australia? Simple Guidelines.

 Your First Working Holiday Visa is going to expire soon? Fear Not! Look at These Useful Tips How to Extend Your Stay in Australia? I’m sure we all share the same passion for Australia and this is because it’s one of the best destinations in the world. Aussies also seem to love Backpackers as they were enabled to stay an extra year longer in the country. So, if you want to stay for another year, you need to make a few quick and easy steps before your first visa expires. First and foremost requirement is that you have spent three calendar months (a total of 88 days) working in so called ‘Regional Australia’ doing ‘Specified Work’. This includes: – Plant and Harvest Work – Animal Cultivation – Fishing and Felling – Mining and Construction You’ve already done all the above – great job! What else you need to qualify? To be eligible for a second year Working Holiday visa, you’ll also need to: –         be aged between 18 – 30 years (inclusive); –         hold a passport from: Belgium, Canada, Republic of Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong SAR (the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) of the People’s Republic of China), Ireland, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Taiwan, UK; –         have not entered Australia before on a Work and Holiday (462) Visa; –         not be accompanied by dependent children at any time during your stay in Australia; –         apply for your second year visa no more than 12 months before your intended departure date in case you apply for the visa from outside Australia. That’s all! Once you get your Second year visa approved and you’ve celebrated this appropriately, you need to be aware of the actual visa validity, or how long can you stay in Australia on your second working holiday visa? –         If you are in Australia at the time of your second working holiday visa application as a holder of a first Working Holiday visa, you can remain in Australia for 24 months from the date you first entered Australia on...

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Posted on Sep 4, 2014 in Australia, Living Abroad, Migration News, Study Abroad, Work & Holiday, Work in Australia, Working Abroad |

From Madrid to Sydney

A reciprocal work and holiday visa agreement was signed yesterday between Australia and Spain. It will allow 500 young people from both countries to head overseas on a holiday and be allowed to work or study. It will also give them a great opportunity to discover a new culture and exchange experience. It’s slightly different from the Working holiday visa as you need to have at least functional level of English or Spanish, be supported by your Government or be a tertiary-level student. It’s expected that this agreement will foster people-to-people links and will boost the constructive relationships between the two countries. Both Australia and Spain declared they will work hard in the coming months to bring this visa into effect.  Visa First is a leading international immigration consulting company. We can help you to apply for your visa fast and hassle-free today.  If you enjoyed this post, please share 🙂 Visa FirstMore...

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Posted on Sep 3, 2014 in Australia, Australian Immigration, Living Abroad, Migration News, Study Abroad, Work in Australia, Working Abroad, Working Holiday Visa |

Overseas Migration will Continue to Increase Until 2016

The Immigration Department in Australia expects that the overseas migration will reach about 250,000 by the end of September and will continue to increase by 2016. This forecast takes into account the number of visa grants as well as data from official sources about the Australian and World economic growth. It also counts the immigration policies announced recently. So, here are some figures: the estimated number of student visas will reach 120,000; 44,000 sponsorship visas will be issued to temporary workers; 65,000 visas to working holiday makers, 48,000 people will get tourist visas and 7,5000 other temporary visas. It is expected that 40,000 skilled workers will be approved, 35,000 family visas, 14,500 humanitarian visas and 5,000 other permanent visas will also be granted. Let’s summarize what it is all about: more and more overseas students will be grated visas for Australia. This is a result of the department efforts to introduce post study work arrangements. Thus the overseas students graduating in the country have the chance to remain longer if they are eligible for a temporary Graduate visa upon completion of their study. Working Holiday maker arrivals will keep on fairly steady by 2018. Visitor, skilled and family visas are also expected to remain unchanged, so no dramatic changes are expected here. Visa First is a leading international immigration consulting company. We can help you to apply for your visa fast and hassle-free today.       Visa FirstMore...

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Posted on Aug 26, 2014 in Australia, Australian Immigration, Backpacking, Living Abroad |

What You Should Know Before Travelling to Australia

 Look at these simple tips and be prepared for the mysterious land Down Under! The sun is stronger in Australia. It’s good to be prepared unless you want to burn out badly. The traffic flow is on the left-hand side of the road but vehicles with the drivers’ controls on either the left or the right are lawful. If you think there are kangaroos walking on the streets and everywhere else, you are wrong. You can find them ‘in the bush’ if you travel inland. Don’t believe the weather forecasts in Australia and be prepared for everything. If you want to sound Australian, shorten your words and add a ‘y’ to everything you say. Capsicum means pepper in Australia. Have this in mind when you go to the grocery stores. Coins are more relevant Down Under because some of them are worth 1 or 2 dollars. So, do not disregard coins in your wallet – you might be richer than you thought. Koalas have pouches as well as any other mammals in Australia except for dingoes – a fact that you should know before heading Down Under. You can find pies at every chain café but Australian pies are not made of fruit. They are filled with meat and very delicious but they are not sweet.  Australian Football and Rugby actually replace Football. So, make sure you know the rules because they are much more complicated.  Visa First is a leading international immigration consulting company. We can help you to apply for your visa fast and hassle-free today. Visa FirstMore...

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Posted on Aug 19, 2014 in Australia, Working Abroad |

Australia’s Economy is Still Healthy

 The Australian Bureau of Statistics released the national accounts which show that Australian economic figures still look optimistic. The mining sector is still booming! Mining is still bringing one of the highest percents towards the annual growth – well in front of the insurance and finance sectors. There are not so many new mines in Australia but the growth in exports is mainly from the mining industry. This is also visible in the growth in gross value added by each sector. The export of goods and services is booming as well – 10.4% increase in the past year which is the strongest growth for more than a decade.  Both nominal and real growth is strong. Labour productivity continues to do well. GDP per hour worked increase 2% in the past year. The labour productivity has increased even more prominent for the last five years – 12.9% growth. The household consumption percentage points continued to grow in the past year. The largest amounts spent are on hotels and restaurants, financial services and insurance. The Australian Bureau of Statistics’ wage price index rose 2.6%. For more information, contact www.visafirst.com. Visa First is a leading international immigration consulting company. We can help you to apply for your visa fast and hassle-free today. Visa FirstMore...

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Posted on Aug 18, 2014 in Australia, New Zealand |

Melbourne and Auckland are the Friendliest Cities in the World for 2014

A new survey shows that Melbourne and Auckland are the friendliest cities in the world for 2014. Melbourne is called ‘the Australian capital of cool’ and ‘one of the classiest cities in the world’ and the people of Auckland are praised for their ‘wonderful sense of humour’ and attitude to life. Australia and New Zealand are named to be the best holiday destinations. Melbourne is given special attention for its abundance of national parks, cuisine, cultural life and world-class arts scenes. Sydney is also ranked high (No 5) and noted a primarily vacation hotspot. Dublin is called a ‘vibrant city’ and takes No 6 in this survey, while no British city is considered particularly unfriendly.  On the other side of the survey, we have big cities such as Paris, Moscow, Beijing and Johannesburg voted as unfriendly places to visit. Two US cities appear on the friendly list – Savannah (Georgia) and Charleston (South Carolina). Other cities ranked in top 10 of friendly cities are: Budapest, Seville, Cape Town, Siem Reap, Victoria (BC). Visa First is a leading international immigration consulting company. We can help you to apply for your visa fast and hassle-free today. Visa FirstMore...

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Posted on Aug 14, 2014 in Australia, Living Abroad, Migration News |

A Retrospection of Australian Food

Given that Australia is a multi-cultural society, nobody is surprised how rich and various Australian food is. In the early colonial days, menus included seafood, native vegetables, fruits and nuts. You may have heard of some Australian some native fruit such as lilly pillies, rosellas or hibiscus, wild raspberries native currants, quandongs etc. With the influence of the European, US and Chinese newcomers, Australians developed the taste to Chinese food and new spices, especially in the port cities. Since early 1900, at the time of Australian Federation, the era of the picnics came, leading to Australian great tradition of barbequing. There’s nothing more Australians than picnic on the open with family and friends. With the innovations later on came new recipes. New terms such as ‘billy of tea’, Anzac biscuits and vegemite spread were added to Australian vocabulary at that time. With the new migrant flow at the end of the Second World War, Australian food was influenced by new styles mainly Mediterranean, Asian, Indian and African. So, what’s the most famous Australian food today? Anzac Biscuits – associated with the Anzac Day (April 25), these biscuits were made by wives during the war and sent to soldiers. The ingredients of the biscuits were well able to keep for a long time. Pavlova – there was a severe competition on the origin of this dessert between Australia and New Zealand for many years. Both countries claim to have invented it and named it after the great Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. And even if it was finally proven that it belongs to New Zealand, Aussies proudly call it Australian food. It’s a dessert that has crisp crust and a soft inside, decorated with cream and fresh fruit. Vegemite spread – The Vegemite spread is a dark brown, yeast-based spread that was invented by a Melbourne scientist as a way to use the yeast left from beer production. Meat pies – nowadays, the meat pie has many variations, often served with mashed potatoes and gravy. This is a traditional meal for every party, sporting event etc. Lamingtons – called the ‘National...

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