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Posted on May 10, 2010 in Living Abroad, Migration News |

Immigrating to the UK might become harder

On May 7, the Conservative party won the elections with the majority of the votes—10,706,647. If the conservatives keep their promises about better immigration control, they will tighten up the rules for everybody who wants to enter and stay in the country. They will supposedly start monitoring closely immigrants from outside the European Union coming in for economic reasons; introduce stricter rules for UK student visas; apply English language test for non-EU immigrants entering the country to get married, and reduce illegal immigration. It will soon become obvious whether the plan will work out or not. We only hope for clarity and fairness. Visa FirstMore...

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Posted on May 4, 2010 in Living Abroad, Migration News |

Labour Party on Immigration

The Labour party believe that controlled immigration has a positive effect on the country. Based on the years of experience, they are confident they have done a lot of positive changes in the immigrant rules. They are implementing “a new Australian-style points-based immigration system,” which will help to let only the skilled immigrants in the country—to help build a stronger economy, per www.labour.org.uk.   They promise that by the end of 2010, in addition to the 100% biometric visas and ID cards for foreign nationals, they will start electric border controls to count people in and out of the country. In order to gain positive results from the new strategy, there will be a points-based system for permanent residence and citizenship, with clearly stated rights and obligations of the candidates—“…because we believe those who look to build a new life here should earn the right to do so.” Such requirements will be to learn English, pay taxes, obey the laws.   “Our Earned Citizenship plans for newcomers, together with the points-based immigration system will reduce overall numbers of economic migrants coming to Britain and the numbers awarded permanent settlement,” say the Labourists. Visa FirstMore...

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Posted on May 4, 2010 in Living Abroad, Migration News |

Immigration & the UK General Election 2010

A lot of issues are being discussed and a lot of promises made. No doubt, there are a lot of important topics to mention, however we decided to stress on what effects people traveling to the UK. One of the biggest problems UK has is the immigration. The country has been trying to cope with the chaos among immigrants and more specifically, the lack of effective rules on who, why and for how long can stay in the country. Lenient immigrant rules have led to rise in crime, people trafficking, etc. The new candidates from the Conservative, Labour and Liberal democrat parties have proposed their solutions on the problem, all promising one—to restrict and better control the immigrant flow. Here is what the parties stand for:   Conservatives on Immigration – The Conservatives say that for the past 12 years there has been nothing but a chaos in the immigration rules… The Labour Party on Immigration – They promise that by the end of 2010, in addition to the 100% biometric visas and ID cards for foreign nationals, they will start electric border controls to count people in and out of the country… Liberal Democrats on Immigration – The Liberal Democrats see immigration as beneficial for Britain, thus they will support legal immigration and promote integration, but will not allow uncontrolled border passing… Visa FirstMore...

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Posted on May 4, 2010 in Living Abroad, Migration News |

Conservatives on Immigration

  The Conservatives say that for the past 12 years there has been nothing but a chaos in the immigration rules. Every time a migration problem rises, the Government proposes new ideas and introduces new Bills, which at the end lead to more confusion and unsolved issues. “Control immigration, reducing it to the levels of the 1990s – meaning tens of thousands a year, instead of the hundreds of thousands a year under Labour,” is one of the measures the Conservative party will take to improve the British economy, according to David Cameron the leader of the Conservative party (conservatives.com). The party will work on a four-step plan and if elected they will: Apply a limit on “the numbers of non-EU economic migrants” allowed to work in the country. The limit will change every year because they will carefully monitor the effect on the economy due to the rising population. Work on preventing illegal migration, thus reducing people trafficking and other crimes, with the help of “dedicated Border Police Force.” “Tighten up the student visa system,” which is so far the weakest system in the border controls. Implement “an English language test for anyone coming here from outside the EU to get married,” which will help for better social integration. Visa FirstMore...

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Posted on Mar 18, 2010 in Living Abroad, Migration News, Working Holiday Visa |

(Un) Employment ?

Economic downturn, recession, crisis, stagnation, unemployment–we are all tired of hearing those as they bring fear and no desire for a little sweet vacation, or escape, or what have you… We got some news for you. Winter is coming to its end, and despite the economic situation that’s been ruling along with the cold for awhile, we see the sun, the beach and the fun at the end of the tunnel. Let’s take a look at some stats and see why Australia is still the place to be for working holiday for the European adventurous souls.   Unemployment Rates – January 2010 Netherlands – 4.2% Australia – 5.3% New Zealand – 7.3% Germany – 7.5% UK – 7.8% Canada – 8.3% US – 9.7% France – 10.1% Ireland – 13.8% Spain – 18.8%     Per stats at epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu, Netherlands has the lowest unemployment rate from the countries in the EU–4.2%, while the average unemployment percent in the EU is 9.5%. Spain has  one of the highest rates of 18.8%, followed only by Latvia with 22.9%. Ireland, with its 13.8% unemployment, is not quite promising yet, either. So far, Australia’s 5.3% is a keeper. Those who want to go there on a working holiday visa and work while having all the fun from being away from home-in another continent-should consider the following: Overall, the employment increased 400 to 10,971,100. However, “Full-time employment increased 11,400 to 7,659,700 and part-time employment decreased 11,000 to 3,311,400,” according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. As a visitor on a working holiday visa for one year, you are allowed to work practically anything for six months after which you need to change the employer. If you look at the statistics, you might want to try to find either a full-time or a part-time job–don’t concentrate on the part-time only as you may have a hard time getting one. The full-time job may give you less time for fun, but on the bright side you will be paid more, and you can still escape from the routine for awhile. References: http://www.tradingeconomics.com/Economics/Unemployment-Rate/ http://www.dol.govt.nz/ http://www.statistics.gov.uk/ http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/ http://www.abs.gov.au/...

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Posted on Aug 11, 2009 in Living Abroad |

Young Irish love affair with OZ still going strong

Edwina estimates that between 3,000 and 4,000 people have emigrated with her company so far this year. Teachers who are finding it hard to get jobs in Ireland because of the cutbacks to the education sector will have no trouble finding work in Australia,  according to Edwina from VisaFirst. “Teachers are sponsored by the Stare in Western Australia and they are really saying ‘we need you now over there‘.” She added: “They’ve changed he migration policy now and individual states have their own shortage list of skilled workers. Before July of last year, a carpenter could apply to anywhere in Australia, but they’d have a waiting list of up to one year.” Meanwhile, those who are looking for work closer to Melbourne and Sydney will also be in demand. In New South Wales they’re looking for accountants, people in the financial area or computing, engineers, and people from pharmacy or medical backgrounds. “It’s easier for native English speakers to apply because any other nationalities have to do an English test before they can go.” Visa FirstMore...

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Posted on Apr 21, 2009 in Living Abroad, UK Working Holiday, Videos |

UK Points Based System Explained

Before the new system was introduced there were more than 80 routes for a non-EU national to enter the UK. The present, much more simpler framework consists of 5 tiers, which help people find the right path to the UK. Tier 1 is for highly skilled individuals willing to practice what they do best in the UK Tier 2 is for skilled workers (nurses, teachers, engineers, etc.) who already have a job offer to work in the UK Tier 3 is for a very limited number of low skilled workers needed to fill temporary labour shortages for a specific project Tier 4 is for students, continuing their education in the United Kingdom Tier 5 is for Youth Mobility and temporary workers (people who are allowed to work in the Uk for a limited time) For each tier there is a point target that the applicants need to meet. Points are awarded according to an objective and transparent criteria, allowing applicants to assess themselves. Visa FirstMore...

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